Harry M. Adams March 30, 1927 - December 31, 1931

Born January 3, 1867 at Comanche, Iowa. Mr. Adams entered railway service in 1880, with the St. Louis & San Francisco as a messenger at Cherryvale, Kansas. He later held various positions in station service on the Kansas City, Fort Scott & Gulf and the Southern Kansas, and in 1886 was made chief clerk in the general baggage department of the Southern Kansas. On June 1, 1887, he became cashier in the local freight office of the same road at Cherryvale, Kansas, and on October 15, 1887, became chief clerk in the general baggage department of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company. From December, 1889, to June 1, 1890, he was consecutively division baggage agent and advertising agent of the Union Pacific at Portland, Oregon. From June 1, 1890 until June 10. 1893, he was baggage agent of the United Storage and Baggage Transfer Company at the same city, following which he spent a year in South America. On March 1, 1894, he entered the traffic department of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company as ticket clerk at Seattle, Washington, following which he was consecutively clerk in the general traffic office at Portland, traveling freight and passenger agent, chief clerk in the general freight department and general agent. On May 15, 1902, he was promoted to assistant general freight agent, with headquarters at Portland, Oregon, and on June 18, 1905, left the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company to become assistant traffic manager of the Great Northern, with headquarters at Seattle, Washington. From December 1, 1907, to June 30, 1910, he was general freight and passenger agent of the Spokane, Portland & Seattle at Portland.

Mr. Adams became the first traffic manager of Western Pacific, serving in that capacity from July 1910 until March 1914. On August 1, 1913, he was also appointed freight traffic manager of the Denver & Rio Grande. In May, 1914, he resigned as freight traffic manager of the Denver & Rio Grande. He then became the general traffic manager of the Missouri Pacific and the St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern beginning in March, 1914. He was then promoted to vice-president in charge of traffic of the reorganized Missouri Pacific, though he continued to have headquarters at St. Louis, Missouri.

On January 11, 1918 he was appointed Director of Inland Traffic, later called the Inland Traffic Service, for the United States Army Quartermaster Corps. By General Orders: War Department, General Orders No. 35 (1919) The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, presented the Army Distinguished Service Medal to Mr. Harry M. Adams, a United States Civilian, for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished services to the Government of the United States, in a duty of great responsibility as Director of Inland Traffic Service, War Department. His responsibilities have been great in supervising the utilization of railroad facilities and the immense movement of troops and supplies during World War I. His excellent judgment and marked ability have contributed materially to the successful and orderly movement of troops and supplies to the ports of embarkation and for the Army overseas.

He was also awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor as described here: Mr. Harry M Adams, director of Inland traffic. For exceptionally meritorious and conspicuous service with the Army of the United States as director of inland traffic. His responsibilities have been great in supervising the utilization of railroad facilities and the immense movement of troops and supplies during the war. His excellent judgment and marked ability have contributed materially to the successful and orderly movement of troops and supplies to the ports of embarkation and for the Army overseas.

Mr. Adams advanced to the peak of his career in April, 1927, when he became president of the Western Pacific and guided that road through a four-year period of expansion, including the building of a line connecting it with the Great Northern. Previously, he had been vice-president of the company after serving as vice-president of the Missouri Pacific and the Union Pacific.

A railroader for 62 years, he retired from railroading and the Western Pacific on January 1, 1932. He made his home at the Hotel Claremont in BerkeIey, California having previously resided at the Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco.

At the age of 65, the retired president of the Western Pacific Railroad died suddenly in Berkeley on July 30, 1932 from a heart attack. Although he had been troubled for some years with a heart ailment, he had been considered in fair health since his retirement, it was stated. He was survived by his widow, Josephine Moore Adams. They had no children.

Funeral services were conducted in Oakland on August 1st with interment in the family plot at Riverview Cemetary in Portland, Oregon.

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